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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

Dealer says there is no need to do a break in oil change, its only for bmw m models. Why is that m series needs an oil change and minis don't.
If there are shavings and small metal particles doesn't filter catch them, if not do they cause damage? if they can cause damage don't they cause enough damage until oil change.
If they are causing damage what is the result do we lose some horse power or engine life.

These engines are mostly alluminum and magnesium right? so how can magnetic oil drain plugs can collect these non ferrous metals.
new.minimania.com/part/G3NME1053-P/Mini-Cooper-Magnetic-Engine-Oil-Drain-Plug-Gen3-M12x15-F55-F56-F54-F57

Thanks.
 

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Hi there,

Dealer says there is no need to do a break in oil change, its only for bmw m models. Why is that m series needs an oil change and minis don't.
If there are shavings and small metal particles doesn't filter catch them, if not do they cause damage? if they can cause damage don't they cause enough damage until oil change.
If they are causing damage what is the result do we lose some horse power or engine life.

These engines are mostly alluminum and magnesium right? so how can magnetic oil drain plugs can collect these non ferrous metals.
new.minimania.com/part/G3NME1053-P/Mini-Cooper-Magnetic-Engine-Oil-Drain-Plug-Gen3-M12x15-F55-F56-F54-F57

Thanks.
Camshaft, drive gears. piston rings are steel, crankshaft is cast iron. all will stick to a magnet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Talked with the service again, guy said in 9 years they didn't do any break in oil changes to minis and its not needed it won't make any difference to change oil. And original drain plugs are not magnetic on any Bmw.
 

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Talked with the service again, guy said in 9 years they didn't do any break in oil changes to minis and its not needed it won't make any difference to change oil. And original drain plugs are not magnetic on any Bmw.
I've done an after break in oil change on all of my MINIs and do oil changes every 6,000 miles, either myself or have the dealer do it.
It's a personal thing, some do it, and some do not. I've always done it and have never seen an engine have problems from more frequent oil changes. If you want to do an after break in oil change go for it.
 
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Have just marked 2.500 km at my odo and I collected patiently a few droplets of lubricant from the filling cap, while the oil was hot. Some visual notes:
- oil is crystal clear, not the slightest sign of dullness, impurities, soot, particles, etc. To be straight, this is with the naked eye, a strong light and an amateur magnifying glass (of 3x power).
- oil is slightly darker (more brownish) than the droplets I observed when it was brand new, say at 50 km at the odo.
- lubricant is very tacky and cohesive when cold, I assume this is the way it should be.

These are my observations that also helped me decide if I should keep the oil or change it after the break-in.

This is not a recommendation by any means, just a visual observation of the state of the oil, for whatever is worth.
 

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No the drain plugs aren't magnetic. Just done a break in oil change on our f54, why?. Don't know probably totally pointless but it only cost me £30 so why not. It certainly can't harm as long as you use top quality oil to minis spec,which i did!

If you read turbo technics and lohens blogs (and a recent tv programme visiting millers oils in yorkshire)about the major cause of turbo failure,engine issues it's these extended service intervals. More regular oil changes are definitely the way to help your engine stay in peak condition.
 
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I stick with my Grand Dad,s advise chance the oil after the 1st 1000 miles on a new car sure you might need it or not but it makes me feel better. I do not wait till the light comes on and than change it. I try to be pro active and have it changed every 7K Miles if its need it or not. I warned my Dealer about my fuzzy oil change habbits.:D:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks guys,

The metal chips floating around doesn't make any sense to me, what is the purpose of oil filter then. If there are metal chips floating around it can also cause damage in 100kms.
 

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Thanks guys,

The metal chips floating around doesn't make any sense to me, what is the purpose of oil filter then. If there are metal chips floating around it can also cause damage in 100kms.
The metal chips would be flushed from the various crevices into the oil pan as part of the normal flow of lubricating oil. Being more dense than oil, they promptly sink to the bottom. No "floating around". If there's a magnetic drain plug, said chips may get stuck there.

The suction pipe inside the oil pan is elevated off the bottom surface to avoid picking up any debris (such as a chip). It probably has a screen on it to deter the big chips. If any little chips get picked up, then they should be stopped by the oil filter long before they could possibly reach a lubricated part.

That's why I don't get too worked up about the idea of chips in the oil. They will get filtered out and cause no harm. The more interesting aspect is what caused the chips in the first place. If it's a byproduct of manufacturing, well, that's sloppy but ultimately harmless. If something broke off inside the engine then the chip is a symptom of a greater failure soon to arrive.

Back in the day when oil filters were generally crappy, chips could get through, and they would cause damage. But they've figured filters out and the engines are well protected. Many engine designs throw lubricating oil from the pan against various engine parts (like the undersides of pistons), and a chip could conceivably cause an issue there if it got picked up (unlikely since it has probably sunk to the bottom of the oil pan) and it lodged in a bad location, and the next splash of oil didn't wash it right off.
 

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The metal chips would be flushed from the various crevices into the oil pan as part of the normal flow of lubricating oil. Being more dense than oil, they promptly sink to the bottom. No "floating around". If there's a magnetic drain plug, said chips may get stuck there.

The suction pipe inside the oil pan is elevated off the bottom surface to avoid picking up any debris (such as a chip). It probably has a screen on it to deter the big chips. If any little chips get picked up, then they should be stopped by the oil filter long before they could possibly reach a lubricated part.

That's why I don't get too worked up about the idea of chips in the oil. They will get filtered out and cause no harm. The more interesting aspect is what caused the chips in the first place. If it's a byproduct of manufacturing, well, that's sloppy but ultimately harmless. If something broke off inside the engine then the chip is a symptom of a greater failure soon to arrive.

Back in the day when oil filters were generally crappy, chips could get through, and they would cause damage. But they've figured filters out and the engines are well protected. Many engine designs throw lubricating oil from the pan against various engine parts (like the undersides of pistons), and a chip could conceivably cause an issue there if it got picked up (unlikely since it has probably sunk to the bottom of the oil pan) and it lodged in a bad location, and the next splash of oil didn't wash it right off.
One more addition to the above: The run-in process does in fact involve some amount of "bedding", where at a microscopic level the metallic Himalayas on the machined parts are reduced to rolling hills in the first few hundred miles (or in the first 30 seconds by the clueless hoons who thrash new engines).

(Uh oh-- is "Clueless Hoon" worse than "Random Internet Yahoo"? I apologize in advance).

But I digress. The result of such wearing is parts that are made congruent to each other and at the exact spacing to allow for optimal oil flow and minimal wear for the life of the engine. A side effect of this is a microscopic metallic powder that washes out into the oil and could conceivably get past a filter, and which I suspect is the main impetus for the fetish about changing the oil after run-in (since filters back in the stone age were not as good as today's crop). If the powder is fine enough to get past a modern filter, it could conceivably find its way in between two parts that are in the process of bedding and scour the respective bearing surfaces. Which would be bad/not good. Or, a far more likely outcome IMHO, the filter will clear the powder out as effectively as it filters out a gigantic chunk of metal. And any powder in solution, fine it may be, will quickly settle to the bottom of the oil pan and contribute to the thick goop that can be found there and drained off during an oil change.

So even though the engineers that designed the engine think it's fine to go 10,000 miles before the first oil change, I can sympathise with the owner that believes in a far more aggressive oil change regimen. And there's zero harm to early and frequent oil changes, other than to the owner's wallet. So go for it.
 

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Nicely put uke. And that is my philosophy. Its cheap enough to diy so why not add in a change to split the mini ones. Like wise then my fears of oil degradation and carbon build up are negated. I am not too bothered about a running in oil change. Just more often.
The oil guy analysis and findings in nam show there's very little metal in the oil in cars these days unless as you say there is a manor eg bearing failure issue!
 
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