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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well guys im getting my first MCS next friday if everything goes as planned, this is the first car ive bought with turbo, and a friend told me you have to take more care to a car with turbo than a non turbo one, so i was investigating about it to see what he meant, and i found out that yeah you have to let oil and water temp to warm up a minute or two before you ride as well as before turning the car off, so my question is:

Doesnt the auto start/stop funcion damage the cars turbo by turning off the car without giving the turbo time to cool off??
 

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Your friend is right, although the critical bit is the switching it off, you don't need to idle before setting off, but it's good practice not to rev it too hard for a mile or two. If you've done a long motorway run and say come off for petrol, turn off stop start before the pump and idle for a min. If you lived a few miles from the motorway letting the engine idle for 30-90 seconds isn't as crucial as the engine will have been at lower revs over a few miles, no harm in doing it.

If they use oil fed turbos, Oil is fed to the turbo, which is red hot and the oil is keeping it lubricated, if you switch off it without letting it cool down a bit it's spinning but with no lubrication as the engine isn't turning over. Hope this helps
 

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Hang on a mo guys no need to panic, on my r56 and am sure bmw will have thought of this on the f56 too, because of the high heats involved with the turbo, to ensure bearing protection they installed a pump that runs even after the engine is switched off to cool the bearings etc. Stop get out and listen and know that you are in a VERY well designed car!
 
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Mind you I do always idle mine after a long run and I change the oil every 6000mls regardless! Just in case-don't think it does any harm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hang on a mo guys no need to panic, on my r56 and am sure bmw will have thought of this on the f56 too, because of the high heats involved with the turbo, to ensure bearing protection they installed a pump that runs even after the engine is switched off to cool the bearings etc. Stop get out and listen and know that you are in a VERY well designed car!

really? cuz i get out of mine and when i turn it off i cant hear a thing... D:
 

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Absolutely, must be thoroughly warm. I never exceed 3000 rpm for the first 5 or so mls.
 

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It has been in the 40s/50s in the mornings where I live. I'm surprised how long it takes this motor to warm up. I'm confident that the 1.8L in my '99 Miata warms up much faster. Not that it really matters, but I thought it would hit operating temp faster.
 

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My habit now is to turn on the temp display until I see the OK.
I asked my delivery specialist at the dealer if it uses synthetic oil and he said yes, but I'm not sure if that's right? ?
 

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It must use synthetic oil. I was told my first oil change was at 8,000 miles. Only synthetic could hold up that long.
 

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Yes def fully synthetic bmw ll04 or acea c3 spec. Here in the uk ours is saying 18000 till first service but will change ours every 6k
 

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The most important thing IMHO is to let the car get up to temperature before you push it.
Absolutely, must be thoroughly warm. I never exceed 3000 rpm for the first 5 or so mls.
In my first Cooper (a 2006 model) I had the Chrono Pack dash, Thus featured an oil temperature indicator and I was always surprised at how long the engine actually took to heat through.... I'd guess 5 miles or so is good advice.



My Chrono Pack dash.

Derek
 

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Lovely dash that. Yes oil takes even longer than the water to get up to temp. Some Ferraris show you a gradually increasing rev limit as the car warms. Brilliant.
 

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In the 1980s I had an Alfasud that had two temperature warning lights - a red one was if the engine got too hot and an amber one came on at a cold start and went off when the engine was warm enough to be caned - an excellent arrangement.

The Alfasud was maybe the best-ever handling front wheel drive car that I have driven and I would like BMW designers to drive one so they knew what they should be able to at least equal 30 years later. In the days before ABS, it was a car that I would take up to the point of brake locking just for the superb steering feel as it happened. Steering it was more like playing a fine musical instrument than something as vulgar as directing a mechanical device.
 
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