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I have had my Cooper S for little over a month and I came out of work yesterday to discover a bird had left a poo on the roof of my car. I got the car home and gave it a wash and was left with a stain on the roof! The roof is black so it makes it quite noticeable! (At least to me anyway). Anyone could give me some advice on getting the stain out?
 

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That's a helpful hint, but my guess is the poster has already removed the crap part of the poop! :)

I've seen this before...the paint finish (after removing the poop) is scarred right?

I'd think the only recourse would be to use a clay bar, or other paint cleaner, buff with cleaner, then polish and wax...only way to get rid of the little bugger! And then, it may not disappear altogether...at least that's been my experience...it's a bummer for sure if you can't get it totally out.
 
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LOL I got a big Bird dropping on the Driver Side Door of the Loaner. I wonder if the Bird was Color Blind since the Loaner is a VO:laugh::laugh:

Birds Poop On Red Cars Most, Study Says

If you drive a car, you'll be blue when you read this: red cars attract more bird droppings than any other color.

The game-changing evidence comes from a new study from Great Britain, which recorded the number of "emissions" made on cars by the birds in five British cities.

More than 1100 cars were analyzed over a two-day period and at the end, 18 percent of the pooped-on cars were red and 14 percent were blue, followed by black (11 percent), white (7 percent), grey or silver (3 percent) and green cars, which only got one percent of the bird bombs, according to Independent Online.


Why are birds targeting red cars more than others? Hard to say conclusively, since Halfords, the British-based auto retailer that sponsored the survey, didn't bother to survey the birds themselves.

Instead, they gathered anecdotal explanations from drivers. For instance, one Lexus driver suggested newly polished cars suffer because birds see a reflection of themselves, while a Ford Focus owner believed the darker the color the deeper the reflection and the more violent the reaction.

Others thought birds saw red as a danger or they went for similar colors to their own plumage. In seaside resorts seagulls went for white cars, while in cities pigeons go for grey.

A spokesman for the British Trust for Ornithology poo-poohed those bird-brained theories and suggested to Independent Online that the key to avoiding bird poop was location.

“We do know that birds can be attracted to certain colors during display, but droppings on cars has probably more to do with where you park; if you park where birds roost, then you are going to get more droppings on your vehicle,” he said.

Perhaps the more important finding from the bird poop poll is not what kind of cars attract the birds, but which owners bother to clean it up.

Only 17 percent said they wiped off deposits as soon as they're discovered, 20 percent said they took action "within a couple of days," and 55 per cent waited until the next car wash, according to TheMotorReport.com.au

Bird poop may stain a car and hurt the paint job, but some people don't think it's crappy.

It's a popular fertilizers and Japanese geishas have long used it to clean stubborn stains or as facial masks on the skin, GeoBeats reported.
 

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Auto glym now say it's the heat not acidity that causes the inflections on modern paint. I carry poor boys bird sh#t remover alway and remove it as soon as spotted. Heat will also remove the inflection, if you can find a body shop to put it under the drying lamps, or just wait for another hot day and you might find the stain reduces.
 

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Only 1 percent of green cars attract bird poop, based on a British study? Duh, that sounds a bit biased toward BRG don't you think? :) Couldn't resist!
 
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As soon as you see a bird dropping clean it right away. Don’t let it dry. If it is already dried, try placing a wet towel above it so that it will prevent drying onto the surface. One of the most effective way is to pre-foam that area. Try to clean your car in a shaded area so that the cleansing solutions won’t dry onto the surface. After foaming , rinse off the area to remove the cleaning solutions from the surface. Then you can use normal shampoo to wash the surface and dry the area with a microfiber cloth. In case of any damage, you can polish the surface. If the dropping is too dry and you are unable to remove it, then the only way is to wet sand the area. I found an online article Sunrise Cleaning Service blog which had few tips on how to clean your car. Just refer this if you need more information.
 

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As above its the heat difference that alters the paint surface so a gentle heat should remove it or leave as it will eventually fade. Whatever you don't do any sanding.
 
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