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Ditto totally nuts, i know the current system is stupid but this seems worse. Get rid of road tax totally and put it on petrol then you pay for what you use! Or keep that cooper!
 

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Ditto totally nuts, i know the current system is stupid but this seems worse. Get rid of road tax totally and put it on petrol then you pay for what you use! Or keep that cooper!


Indeed. I worked out yesterday you can pick up an original coopers s (of new shape) for £2-3k. But it now costs £1200 a year to tax.


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New tax bands only apply to newly registered cars it doesn't change anything for older cars
Also the new, punitive rates are only the fist year tax. The annual rate is then £140 on everything except cars costing over £40k. So thirstier cars may actually be better off after the first hit (which will effectively just be part of the on-the-road price).
 

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I've never ever understood the amount of belly-aching that goes on around road tax given it's such a tiny amount. You've chosen a Mini, which regardless of how much we like them is a bit of a rip-off, if you're doing 15,000 miles a year you'll probably pay the thick end of £3,000 in fuel, the insurance market is completely inflated like it's a con artist's convention and people whine about tax. What they do with it and how just it is is another matter, but from a purely financial perspective it's a comparative drop in the ocean.
 

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True too-I've never looked at road tax cost and bought a car or not bought a car since it isn#t that significant BUT i think the point is it doesnt seem very logical-but then is there a logical way of doing it-pollution, weight of car re amount of road wear-if it were spent on the roads which it mostly isn't? Personally putting it all on petrol / diesel and doing away with the yearly bill all together would seem most logical-the more petrol you use the more you pay-unless of course you have a very economic or electric car-still think they should contribute though!
 

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The only time road tax became a big deal for us was during the 2006 Budget, when they announced that all cars 226g/km and above would be subject to a penal rate of about £500pa. Both of our cars at the time were above that (one was 227g/km!) so we were suddenly facing an annual bill of £1,000, and an instant depreciation hit to both cars. There was quite an outcry at the time and the rules were modified to only apply the penal rates to cars registered after the date of the Budget (23/3/06).

When we bought our current 5 door Cooper D, the fact that it was zero VED (for life, apparently) was a factor in its favour. Over the perhaps 12 years and 100k miles we expect to keep it, it becomes a fairly significant sum, although much less than depreciation and fuel..
 

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True too-I've never looked at road tax cost and bought a car or not bought a car since it isn#t that significant BUT i think the point is it doesnt seem very logical-but then is there a logical way of doing it-pollution, weight of car re amount of road wear-if it were spent on the roads which it mostly isn't? Personally putting it all on petrol / diesel and doing away with the yearly bill all together would seem most logical-the more petrol you use the more you pay-unless of course you have a very economic or electric car-still think they should contribute though!
The logic is simple and to an extent the new taxation is mostly on fuel.
The problem with the current regime is that because emissions have been dropping, more and more cars have got into the low/no tax brackets and tax revenues have been falling. So the government wants that income stream returned. Hence in future all cars (except full electric) will pay over £100 a year tax. The incentive to buy greener cars is then purely on the cost of fuel and the initial punitive first year's tax. They won't want to put all the tax on fuel because that isn't such a stable stream, and people with low emission cars doing little mileage would pay very little.
On the other hand they've set the ongoing value at a level (as said further up) that isn't unaffordable - less than most annual insurance for example.
It may be annoying but it's actually quite clever.
 

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I wouldn't be surprised in coming years existing vehicles don't also get a rise in duty, but who knows how Governments work?
 

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Mm you're persuading me there maybe logic to it. ! Howver most buyers wont even look at the first year tax as that will appear to be the selling price of the car. I know now you pay some but i havent a clue how much BUT i do know thereafter yearly our roadster is 130 and a new cooper s will be 140! Because thats the one that i pay from my pocket.
 

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I wouldn't be surprised in coming years existing vehicles don't also get a rise in duty, but who knows how Governments work?
I did wonder about this too, although apparently cars 99g/km and below (the One D and Cooper D) remain free of VED for life, according to numerous media articles. Not completely sure I believe that though.
 

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OK so the argument if you do 15K is probably right

but what about those of us who only do 2-3K a year

lucky my wife and me have now avoided the new price, but if we hadnt, I would be
up in arms about this tax.

The car price is the car price, dont care if its over inflated, its the cars we want.
but I dont want to be paying 145 a year for a car that sits on the drive or in the garage for most of the year.
Im in agreement with put it on petrol/diesal but they already do, this is just an excuse to get even more.

generally i agree with those who use the roads more should pay more tax, again why the petrol tax should be enough, which again re-iterates, this change is just another way for the government to steal more money from us
to to fund another stupid idea.

it wont go to fix the potholes, or resurface the roads, or build additional roads, it will be frittered away on some other rubbish that most of us dont want or need.
 

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but I dont want to be paying 145 a year for a car that sits on the drive or in the garage for most of the year
.....
it wont go to fix the potholes, or resurface the roads, or build additional roads, it will be frittered away on some other rubbish that most of us dont want or need.
So you happily pay insurance and depreciation for a car that sits most of the year, but are upset by the VED because that's the government?
Given the carbon emissions involved in building a car having one and not using it could actually be construed as a case for higher taxes on ornaments. (And to head off any comments on these lines, I'm in a similar situation with low mileage/lives in the garage.) Financially (and logically) I'd be better off getting rid of one car and using taxis to fill the odd gap. We already use buses a fair bit as we have OAP passes and a good service, so I accept that our cars are largely optional/luxury items and accept there are costs to that.

We know the revenue raised won't go on the roads. As I alluded in my earlier post this is just another income stream for the government. Anyone that can afford the other ongoing costs of car ownership can afford £140 a year tax.
 

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I did wonder about this too, although apparently cars 99g/km and below (the One D and Cooper D) remain free of VED for life, according to numerous media articles. Not completely sure I believe that though.
ok let's get this right--all cars up to the 1st April are taxed as now-and will be so for life or so they are saying-mind you they can change their minds!

Cars after 1st April under 40k will be 140 year road tax and over that will be an additional fee for the first 5 years.

SO if you want low tax keep what you have now-cooper d's and coopers and cooper s and jcw will all be 140 year after that (subject to inflationary incs too of course!).

Only free cars will be pure electric after 1April! Any sniff of petrol or diesel in there and they will pay the same as everyone else!
 

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yes id happily pay the insurance, because I actually get something for that, (ie protection )

im not bothered about depreciation, any more than im bothered about the amount my house goes up in value every year, its does not matter as long as the car is the same as when i bought it.

and id happily pay the RT if it actually contributed to the service i use.

regards peter :)
 

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Agree wintpe wish just a fraction of what we paid went to maintain and improve our roads-i feel the same i am afraid-you buy the car knowing what band it is re insurance and roughly how much you will lose and you could argue yes we know what the road tax will be ; it is just that a lot of people feel we are paying for something we don't get and isn't necessarily fairly calculated. This could run and run and it could be argued there's no real fair way of paying it-but i still think fuel is the answer! No chance of escaping paying it ever then, plus anyone visiting pays their contribution too!
 

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Agree wintpe wish just a fraction of what we paid went to maintain and improve our roads-i feel the same i am afraid-you buy the car knowing what band it is re insurance and roughly how much you will lose and you could argue yes we know what the road tax will be ; it is just that a lot of people feel we are paying for something we don't get and isn't necessarily fairly calculated. This could run and run and it could be argued there's no real fair way of paying it-but i still think fuel is the answer! No chance of escaping paying it ever then, plus anyone visiting pays their contribution too!
There is no "Road Tax", it was abolished in 1937. Even when there was such a tax it did not cover the total cost of roads.
Roads have always been paid for out of consolidated revenues at both local and national levels, motorists have always been subsidised by other taxpayers.
 

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There is no "Road Tax", it was abolished in 1937. Even when there was such a tax it did not cover the total cost of roads.
Roads have always been paid for out of consolidated revenues at both local and national levels, motorists have always been subsidised by other taxpayers.
While I agree that VED does not fully cover the cost of the UK's roads, VED + fuel duty covers the cost many times over, so you can't really say that motorists are subsidised by other taxpayers.

Personally, I see the fact that VED + fuel duty produces a large surplus as a positive. It's an effective form of taxation which is tough to avoid.
 
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