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I'm 6 months and 3,750 miles into driving my CooperS auto and only one thing is really bugging me about the car: brake squeaking. I do mostly city driving so the obvious fix would be to take the car out on the open road and do some more "severe" braking, to resolve the squeaks. But that doesn't seem to be fixing it. So, every day, in and out of town, when the car comes to a halt there's a nasty squeak. I've checked the car into Berry Chiswick (London UK) for a check and hopefully it will be easily resolved but pretty surprised to have this in such a young car. Anyone else?:nerd:
 

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I'm 6 months and 3,750 miles into driving my CooperS auto and only one thing is really bugging me about the car: brake squeaking. I do mostly city driving so the obvious fix would be to take the car out on the open road and do some more "severe" braking, to resolve the squeaks. But that doesn't seem to be fixing it. So, every day, in and out of town, when the car comes to a halt there's a nasty squeak. I've checked the car into Berry Chiswick (London UK) for a check and hopefully it will be easily resolved but pretty surprised to have this in such a young car. Anyone else?:nerd:
Hey,

Did you have a fix for this? My SD auto has started to do this pretty non stop and consistently, my driving is also mainly town and my foot is often on the break creeping forward in traffic but it's creeping and screeching!

Look forward to hearing back!
 

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Assuming there isn't a mechanical problem, try using the breaks harder from 60 mph down to 20 several times. This puts a transfer layer from pad heat onto the discs which should stop any low speed squeaking. The squeal is from abrasive polishing of the discs at low temperature.

Attached is a video that outlines new pad bed-in which would be beneficial even for well used pads that do a lot of low speed gentle stopping.

 

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I had this a few months ago, so mentioned it when I got the car serviced.


"there's nothing wrong with the brakes, a bit worn.... we could try cleaning them?"


"worth a try, will I just leave it now?"


"can do... but that's not covered, so be £160...."


"ok, I'll just leave it then."


I got speaking to one of the mechanics, who gave me a couple of little sachets of their copper grease to apply - special stuff, main ingredient is rocking horse poo I believe. Anyway a few weeks ago I took the rear pads out, cleaned everything and applied the grease to the back of the pads and the contact points where they slide too - seems to have done the trick. Took no more than 1 hour.


Brandon I expect this is roughly how your visit will go too, but they might do it as a goodwill gesture as you can't have too many miles on there yet.
 

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After installing the JCW BBK on my car I made it a point to break them in ASAP. On the way home from the shop I made at least a half dozen passes from 60 down to 15-20mph. I did them back to back to heat and bed the pads to the discs. After that I drove for another 30-45 minutes to allow them to cool naturally. No problems with noise and they'll make you feel like your eyes are gonna pop out if you get on them hard. W did use antiseize/lube on the metal to metal contact points between pads and calipers.
 

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So that's what is wrong then, my breaks haven't completely broken in yet?

I honestly can't creep without being embarrassed pulling up next to someone, it's not the most sexy noise. I videoed it today to send to the dealership, see the video below - 90% of the high pitched squeak is me, it's literally as I just touch the break pedal to come to a stop from a creep - any harder and it doesn't squeak.

 

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I had the same with my R55 JCW as my commute was in traffic but did the above, high speed braking and be all good again :)
I went on a forty mile round trip on the motorway with harsh breaking from 60mph to 20mph when coming off the slip roads, did it maybe four times.. Pull in to the Starbucks drive-thru and it squeaks more than ever. :|
 

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You need to do it one right after the other. Don't give the brakes time to cool down between runs. This is the reference I found a while back. I've used it when installing new brakes on my F56, R56, and Corvette. Hasn't let me down yet.


Bedding-in street performance pads

For a typical performance brake system using street-performance pads, a series of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, will typically raise the temperature of the brake components sufficiently to be considered one bed-in set. Each of the ten partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80 to 90% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.
Depending on the make-up of the pad material, the brake friction will seem to gain slightly in performance, and will then lose or fade somewhat by around the fifth stop (also about the time that a friction smell will be detectable in the passenger compartment). This does not indicate that the brakes are bedded-in. This phenomenon is known as a green fade, as it is characteristic of immature or ‘green' pads, in which the resins still need to be driven out of the pad material, at the point where the pads meet the rotors. In this circumstance, the upper temperature limit of the friction material will not yet have been reached.
As when bedding-in any set of brakes, care should be taken regarding the longer stopping distance necessary with incompletely bedded pads. This first set of stops in the bed-in process is only complete when all ten stops have been performed - not before. The system should then be allowed to cool, by driving the vehicle at the highest safe speed for the circumstances, without bringing it to a complete stop with the brakes still applied. After cooling the vehicle, a second set of ten partial braking events should be performed, followed by another cooling exercise. In some situations, a third set is beneficial, but two are normally sufficient.
 

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You need to do it one right after the other. Don't give the brakes time to cool down between runs. This is the reference I found a while back. I've used it when installing new brakes on my F56, R56, and Corvette. Hasn't let me down yet.


Bedding-in street performance pads

For a typical performance brake system using street-performance pads, a series of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, will typically raise the temperature of the brake components sufficiently to be considered one bed-in set. Each of the ten partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80 to 90% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.
Depending on the make-up of the pad material, the brake friction will seem to gain slightly in performance, and will then lose or fade somewhat by around the fifth stop (also about the time that a friction smell will be detectable in the passenger compartment). This does not indicate that the brakes are bedded-in. This phenomenon is known as a green fade, as it is characteristic of immature or ‘green' pads, in which the resins still need to be driven out of the pad material, at the point where the pads meet the rotors. In this circumstance, the upper temperature limit of the friction material will not yet have been reached.
As when bedding-in any set of brakes, care should be taken regarding the longer stopping distance necessary with incompletely bedded pads. This first set of stops in the bed-in process is only complete when all ten stops have been performed - not before. The system should then be allowed to cool, by driving the vehicle at the highest safe speed for the circumstances, without bringing it to a complete stop with the brakes still applied. After cooling the vehicle, a second set of ten partial braking events should be performed, followed by another cooling exercise. In some situations, a third set is beneficial, but two are normally sufficient.
That sounds like a **** load of work, plus I feel like I'd get pulled by the police as the only place I could potentially do this is an empty motorway or car park.

Thank you and I appreciate your assistance, although I'd usually go try it I'm a little hesitant of police.

My car is booked in on the 11th July - I'll let MINI do it.
 

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Are you ready for this?

The technician was apparently able to replicate the squeaking as per the video, suggested it was due to warm weather and the fact my car is fitted with an automatic gearbox. He said because your only pressing lightly on the break to bring your car to a stop, the gearbox is still putting power to the wheels making the car move.. Therefore this will be causing the squeaking.

Here's the dick head bit.. Resolution: just put your car in neutral in traffic to stop it from creeping.

WHEN, other than being towed and changing from P to D or D to R does an automatic get put in neutral?

I politely told the service lady that is was utter bollocks and no other automatic I've driven has had break squeak due to it being 'automatic'. Basically this wise guy has just told me that MINI have designed the gearbox to make the breaks squeak so please with caution just engage neutral.

I can't get over this utter bull poo.
 
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Okay well I've just done 6 or 7 runs up and down my road 60mph to 20mph... My brakes are supposed to smell and smoke right? :O Letting them cool down and going to do it again in an attempt to stop the squeaky brakes!

My disks have like a dark blue tinge to them at the moment, I presume this is from the pad.
 

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Have you solved?
Nope - it was still squeaking after my first run on cooling them down. I've just done my second lot, they feel a lot more grippy and seem to stop the car in a much shorter distance than before... Whether it'll mean they don't squeak in low creeping traffic is another question.

I'll keep you posted. :(
 

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Been reading about automatics and it is apparently much better for the box if you're stationary for any amount of time to put it in neutral. However the creeping def should not cause brake squake! Just less wear on the auto box! (And yes I know no one does)
 
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Mine has started doing over over the last couple of months too. MCS, 64 Plate, Manual, 11k miles. Im going to get mine booked in to get it checked out. Ill let you know the outcome.
 
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