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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, brand new SE owner (48hrs and counting) and it’s our first EV. Needless to say I’ve been doing some high speed learning on Kw and charging , etc.

First off, the level 1 charger that came with it is useless… it wants more than 24 hours to charge and after 6+ hours the charge only went from 28 to 29%. Might be my house and also I mistakenly plugged the charger into an extension cord, since It didn’t reach the car :-0. Didn’t know I found the do that, and that was probably slowing it down, along with dangerous! Gonna order a level 2 charger here soon and get it properly installed.

Anyway, took it to a DC charging station and selected the 0-90kw charge option instead of the super fast 150kw… from what I’ve read the Mini battery accepts a charge rate of 50kw… so, does the charger automatically adjust? Or did I just fry my car with a 90kw charge?

Thanks, and glad to be here!

Derrick


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No you won't fry it the car only accepts what it can and will control pace of charge during time is it slows up after 80% too I think. Weird the granny charger shouldnt be that bad. Maybe the extension ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Jeremy. I was pretty sure that’s how it worked, but wanted to confirm.

On the granny it must’ve been the extension cord? It’s one of those ubiquitous light duty orange ones. There is an old dryer plug in that same utility room by the car :) but our dryer’s in the laundry room, so if I put a level 2 there that would be TWO 30a things (plus HVAC) in a 100a house… if I don’t charge during laundry time I’m golden haha! But don’t think an electrician would clear me to do that.


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When using a high powered DC charger the car limits the charge to 50kWh regardless of the charger's output capability.

For the granny charger you need to set the car's AC charging current setting to Max (10A) as the default setting is Min. Refer to the Owner's Handbook. Once this has been changed the charger will add about 6% battery charge every hour.

You can use an extension cable inside a garage but it must be rated for a current of at least 13A otherwise a fire could result.

Alan
 

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Thanks Jeremy. I was pretty sure that’s how it worked, but wanted to confirm.

On the granny it must’ve been the extension cord? It’s one of those ubiquitous light duty orange ones. There is an old dryer plug in that same utility room by the car :) but our dryer’s in the laundry room, so if I put a level 2 there that would be TWO 30a things (plus HVAC) in a 100a house… if I don’t charge during laundry time I’m golden haha! But don’t think an electrician would clear me to do that.


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Worst case scenario is the breaker will trip, assuming your distribution board has RCD’s fitted.
Make sure the extension lead is fully unwound and is RCD protected. Also, try to keep the extension lead indoors and not exposed to the elements.
 

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The only "fast" charger I used was on the way back from Stanstead, the "electric highway" one at Braintree (actually South Notley) and all their chargers with the correct cable for the MINI said 90kW.
As soon as I plugged the cable in (and pre-paid with my contactless credit card) the charge display in the MINI said "limited to 50kW" or similar words.
You should have nothing to worry about, it appears the battery management software covers you against whatever you plug in....
 

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Worst case scenario is the breaker will trip, assuming your distribution board has RCD’s fitted.
Make sure the extension lead is fully unwound and is RCD protected. Also, try to keep the extension lead indoors and not exposed to the elements.
RCDs detect earth leakage and do not offer protection against overheating per se. Extension cables for outside use need to be designed specifically for the purpose.

Alan
 

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Oh, and the "Granny charger" (the 13A plug one you get) is good for about 26% charge on an overnight 4 hour slot (ie, Octopus Go, 12:30 - 4:30 at 5p per kWhr) If you don't get 26% in 4 hours there is something wrong somewhere.
I'm still waiting for my 7kW wall charger - part of my purchase price - and if it ever arrives, that's a full charge overnight in the 4 hour slot.
But, as Agriff mentioned above, you do have to set the charge rate in the MINI software to maximum to get the best from a basic 13A socket, they are supplied set at minimum.

Unless you are going to get a 7kW wall charger, I would strongly suggest a proper 240V, 13A independent socket (I installed one on my garage external wall pending getting the wall charger) and never use an extension lead unless it is specifically rated for outside high current use.
 

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My granny charger was plugged in to an IP66 external extension with 2.5mm² core cabling, plugged into a wall socket in my garage and run out to my drive. This worked perfectly and charging rate was as expected. At work I use it to plug into an external power socket and, again, all good (this morning it put in 6 kWh in 2:45).

Last week I had a PodPoint wall charger fitted which is noticeably quicker (the last charge was 16 kWh in 2:41). I have 100A in the house and this charger has a current detection system meaning that if the total load on the house approaches the limit the charger will ease off.
 

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You probably know this, but if you are using a 13amp socket/lead to charge your car you should unplug from the mains when you have finished. This helps to clean the contacts on the socket and keeps them in good condition.
 

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Last week I had a PodPoint wall charger fitted which is noticeably quicker (the last charge was 16 kWh in 2:41). I have 100A in the house and this charger has a current detection system meaning that if the total load on the house approaches the limit the charger will ease off.
My problem is that I'm still waiting for my wall charger - three months after I paid for it - and they won't install it until the area board change my incoming fuse to 80A (current one is 60A and I can't have 100A because of the incoming cable size) but getting the 80A fuse upgrade is just an empty promise.....
Given that BoJo the clown has promised all houses built from next year onwards must have an EV charging point, I'll probably have to buy a new house to get one...
 

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My problem is that I'm still waiting for my wall charger - three months after I paid for it - and they won't install it until the area board change my incoming fuse to 80A (current one is 60A and I can't have 100A because of the incoming cable size) but getting the 80A fuse upgrade is just an empty promise.....
I wonder if you're being fobbed off by the installer Rod? Home chargers have jump settings or switches in the box to set the maximum charging current. I don't see why the installer can't go ahead with the installation and set the current at 16A (for example) until the supply is upgraded. You wouldn't be able to charge at maximum current but it would still be faster than the granny charger plus the charger would be there ready and waiting for the upgrade.

Alan
 

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Yes, I had this conversation with the guy who came around to do the survey and submitted the order for the fuse change.
He basically said his company won't do the install until the main fuse is corrected as they don't want to come out twice.
Which I think is a fair response.
Try telling that to BoJo the clown....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My granny charger was plugged in to an IP66 external extension with 2.5mm² core cabling, plugged into a wall socket in my garage and run out to my drive. This worked perfectly and charging rate was as expected. At work I use it to plug into an external power socket and, again, all good (this morning it put in 6 kWh in 2:45).
I’m in the US, but think a 10guage extension cord is similar as it can handle 16-20 amps. And looks like our 110v outlets (sad, I know) can handle around 15 amps, so maybe can get a level 1 with a little more power, but think I’m gonna shoot for level 2. BTW maybe that’s one reason why the granny charger seems so slow to you guys as this is off a 110 outlet :) it’s maddeningly slow. And I doubt we’re getting as good of a charger that comes with with the car over here. US dealers tend to skimp on stuff like that, haha!


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US electrics are quite different from the UK so much of what has already been said doesn't apply and should be ignored for safety reasons.

Alan
 

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From my time living / working in the USA I thought you had some 220V supplies for high current use, cookers etc. rather than just the 110V stuff (yes, sad, I've been there).

Surely the MINI electric dealers in your country would organize a 220V charger ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
From my time living / working in the USA I thought you had some 220V supplies for high current use, cookers etc. rather than just the 110V stuff (yes, sad, I've been there).

Surely the MINI electric dealers in your country would organize a 220V charger ?
Yes the 220v outlets are for dryers and ovens, etc… which would take a “Level 2” charger. The Level 1 chargers (sounds like your granny) work from the standard 110v 3 prong outlet… 15a max and the one the dealer gave me is 10a/1.2kw… Thats what people get with the car is some sort of “Level 1” 10a charger, which can take near 18-20 hrs to 80%

So if you want a 4 hour charge (which sounds like your base model) you need to buy a 30-40a Level 2 charger that runs from those 220 outlets (which are usually only located in the laundry room, so you have to have a dedicated 220 outlet installed in the garage, which is pricey…provided you have a newer 200 amp house and not a 100 amp house (you can upgrade to a 200a home for thousands of dollars. No thanks) and then cough up for a level 2 charger which runs anywhere from $350-$800 US. They don’t make it easy.

I’m lucky the storage space in the garage was once a laundry room, so it has an old 220v outlet… just need to check to see if it works with an electrician, NEVER charge while my dryer is running in the proper laundry room, and, of course, drop $399 US on a 30a Level 2 charger. I will at least get some kind of rebate from the power company though.

Quite the ordeal over here if you want an EV with a respectable charging option at home. Guess we still like our muscle cars too much :)


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Our dealer supplied charger, a 13A plug basic thing is 2.3kW. That's what we get for the purchase price from MINI but most dealers over here are offering a 7kW wall mounted charger which is hard wired straight from the incoming supply. I'm still waiting for mine to be installed but that's another story and that's what I was referring to in terms of charge time, 7kW charging will bring the battery up to 80% plus in 4 hours easily.

Most of the "public" charge points are also 7kW although the infrastructure is beginning to improve, I have used a 50kW plus one near one of our airports, but 7kW is the usual in my part of the UK.

The four hours I mentioned is because one of the largest independent electricity suppliers in the UK (Octopus) do an EV friendly rate between 12:30 and 04:30 especially for EVs at 5p/kWhr. Just set the timer in the MINI for those overnight hours and - EDIT, once I get my 7kW charger, END edit - get up to 140 miles for £1.40 (I'll let you convert that to US$)
 

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First off, the level 1 charger that came with it is useless… it wants more than 24 hours to charge and after 6+ hours the charge only went from 28 to 29%.
I've been using the level 1 charger for over a year now without any complaints. It really depends on how much you drive each day.

For me, I drive my car 10-30 miles in a day and then I'll go a few days before driving it again. I drive it on the weekend more than any other time.

When I come home, I plug it in. It might be as low as 75% or 80% so it takes just a few hours to reach 100%.

It is a different mindset coming from an ICE powered car where you fill it up when you run out of gas. With an electric car, you just plug it in after every trip so it always reaches 100%. If you drive 80-100 miles a day, you probably will want a level 2 charger at home but if not, the level 1 works just fine.
 
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