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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This past week while driving on the New Jersey Turnpike, I picked up a screw in one of my rear tires. I was coming of the 15-X helix and the TPMS light came on. I used my mirror to see that the tire was still inflated and continued on to my destination which was less than a mile away. I parked the car and as soon as I opened the door, I could hear the tire hissing. Upon closer inspection I discovered the screw in the tread. I did a quick search for a tire shop and located one just a few miles away. The tire still had sufficient air, so I drove to the tire shop. I told the guy at the counter that I had a screw in the tire and needed it plugged. He refused saying that he couldn't plug a run-flat. When I asked him why, he stated that it was illegal to do so. I asked him if he had a replacement tire, he said it would not be in until the following day. He also gave me the news that it was going to be $250 just for the tire. I had them put some air in the tire and I drove back to my original destination. I did my meetings and then enlisted one of my colleagues to take me to a parts store. I picked up a plug kit and a portable compressor. I then went back and pulled this out of the tire:



I had a heck of a time getting the plug into the tire, but after some trying managed to stop the air leaking.

I did some reading on run-flats and could not find a definitive answer on whether it was acceptable to use a plug. I decided to replace the tire. I did some shopping around and found a good deal ($140ea w/road hazard warranty) on the same tires at Tirerack. I decided to buy two. The tires came in the next day and I had them mounted and balanced (another fifty bucks). I kept the two tires I removed as they only have about 23k miles on them.

After seeing the inside of the tires I removed and the way that the plug came through the tire, I am doubting that I actually needed to replace them. The plug came through the tread and was protruding approximately 3/8" inside the tire. It is slightly balled on the end, and was well adhered. Here's a picture for reference:



I'm now carrying a plug kit and the portable compressor under the front seat.

I'd be interested in hearing any opinions on the plugging of Run-Flats.

Thanks
 

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After getting ripped of by saying I needed a new tyre at rip off prices I tried different tyre outlets and some said no problem while others said no. So far I've had 4 plugged and never had a issue, I'd only have it done if the puncture was in the tread area of the tyre...
 

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Forgot to add I'd only do as long as I'd not driven the tyre with no air in it.......


I also think run flats are more prone to punctures, not sure if it's because of the lack of flex....
 

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The rules have been relaxed to permit tyre plugging on run flats which is great news. Obviously ifthe puncture isono near the sidewall, this is an instant replacement.
There is a limit on how many plugs your legally allowed to use before the tyre becomes unroadworthy but dont know the exact quota.

I reckon Davyboy is correct in run flats have a higher risk of punctures. The more riggid the tyre, the higherthe puncture risk. Take 4wd for example, when rock crawling or driving over river beds etc, you must lower your tyre pressure to not only gain extra tread but to have more flex in the tyre to absorb possible protrusions.
 

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I prefer a patch rather than a plug for a long term repair. I carry a Dynaplug kit with a Viair 12 volt compressor for on the road repairs. I generally ditch the run flats immediately and purchase a good set of grippy performance tires. Although I am going to run the factory run flats on this mini until they are worn and then have some good, sticky, comfortable, quiet riding tires mounted. Most likely Michelins. I do the same with the corvette and just switch the kit from vehicle to vehicle. I also carry a large can of aerosol Slime as a last resort if needed. I am willing to toast a sensor rather than sitting on the side of some desolate mountain road waiting for a rollback.
 

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I feel your pain. I too had the same issue as you. My car was only 6 months old, and 2000 km. I was told that this kind of tire can't be plugged.
$320 later...ouch for 1 new run flat tire. The screw in my tire was on the tread. Boy was I mad. I also heard like other have said, that this kind of tire is more prone to punctures. My TPM sensor NEVER went off with a tire that had already lost most of its air. I told Mini about this, and they shrugged my issue off. Again it doesn't make any sense to me. I only wished that the F56 had non run flat tires equipped with this model with a jack. I feel less secure that I don't have these options any more. So much for technology, a blessing and a curse.
 

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Interesting article from National Tyres at https://www.national.co.uk/information/run-flat-tyres - they don't plug run-flats.

Two points got my attention...fitters can't be sure how far /fast a tyre has been driven, so can't be sure of the structural integrity of the tyre. Also, suspension / handling set up for run-flats supplied as original equipment. Anyone checked this with BMW/Mini and got revised suspension settings? (suspect they'll simply state that they don't recommend it)

I'm in the fortunate position of my MCS being a company car so don't have to pay for replacement tyres. Unfortunately I do think the run-flats are noisier, but don't have the option of changing them (against company policy).
 

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I don't think the set up is any different for run flat or non run flats.

My last JCW came with run flats as they all do as standard, I switched to non run flats and my local dealer did the change for me even saying it was the best thing I could do!

Done this with my last 3 MINIs and in my opinion makes the car handle how it should, with my Cooper it came as standard with non run flats..
 

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Some places will fix a run flat and some won't just depends on their policy. I've done it and use what is called a Uni-Seal plug/patch combination, it's a patch installed inside the tire that has a plug attached it to fill the hole. They work really well.
 

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I have previously had a garage repair a runflat that had a roof bolt in it. I accepted the risk that the structure may be compromised (mmm) and made a note of which tyre it was, so if in future the TPMS showed that tyre was losing pressure then I knew not to continue to drive on it, although who is to know if one of the other tyres has been compromised by some of the potholes we find hard to avoid!

There is always a risk driving on runflats when one (or more) has lost pressure, especially if you don't take extra care, it's best not to drive on them as that will mean less garages are willing to repair them. I'd prefer to ditch the RF's and run normal tyres with a repair kit tbh.
Here's some good 'independant' advice; RoSPA
 

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My brother in law has a tyre shop and he told me that repairing punctured run flat tyre is not different from a regular tyre. Only the sides of a run flat are reinforced with steel to remain in shape even when all air escaped from the tyre. Compound is identical. However the place of the puncture determines if it's legal and safe to make a repair by using a plug. Also here no difference between a regular tyre and a run flat tyre.
 

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Only had my JCW a couple of weeks and I ran over a nice roof screw on the way home. I should've left it in but I was hoping it wasn't too bad. Anyway I took it out at home and it started hissing and yeah the rest is history. I want to try to get it plugged tomorrow. Rather not fork out for a new tyre as this one is new already. Spewing!!
 

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Only had my JCW a couple of weeks and I ran over a nice roof screw on the way home. I should've left it in but I was hoping it wasn't too bad. Anyway I took it out at home and it started hissing and yeah the rest is history. I want to try to get it plugged tomorrow. Rather not fork out for a new tyre as this one is new already. Spewing!!
Unlucky Twadds, you should keep to the road and stop driving on peoples roofs.

Looks like a simple plug job. If you wanted to save some money, buy a plug kit from any auto shop, follow the instructions, pump up the tyre and your good to go.
 

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Only had my JCW a couple of weeks and I ran over a nice roof screw on the way home. I should've left it in but I was hoping it wasn't too bad. Anyway I took it out at home and it started hissing and yeah the rest is history. I want to try to get it plugged tomorrow. Rather not fork out for a new tyre as this one is new already. Spewing!!
Unlucky Twadds, you should keep to the road and stop driving on peoples roofs.

Looks like a simple plug job. If you wanted to save some money, buy a plug kit from any auto shop, follow the instructions, pump up the tyre and your good to go.
Got it plugged this morning. $40 at bob Jane.
 
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