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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled this from BMWBLOG's recent first drive of the F56 MINI's

Both motors use direct fuel injection, variable valve timing and turbocharging in order to be more efficient. Auto Start/Stop is standard but easily disabled should you choose. These motors are so fuel efficient, that I suspect they could erode the market for diesels in the United States. As far as weight goes, the new Cooper weighs 2,605 lbs, while the Cooper S weighs 2,760 lbs. Both up from the last generation Coopers by just under 100 lbs. Brake energy regeneration and energy efficient oil pumps are standard as well.
I agree, to a degree. In terms of small diesels yes absolutely, but when you start to climb in engine size and capabilities I just dont see how petrol could ever eclipse. Its the same issue that hybrids fall prey to. Small cars are often the favorite for hybrid conversion, the problem is, small cars are already exceptionally fuel efficient and hybridizing them is simply an incremental increase. I feel the same about small diesels.
 

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The key to keeping diesels obsolete with the use of gas engines is what you said, keeping gasoline engines small. Either they do that or find more ways to make bigger gasoline engines more fuel efficient and that latter will be harder to do.
 

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There has been a trend toward 4-cylinder engines that have turbos in them or something to get better performance out of them. I think that trend will continue and will make diesels less relevant but I also think that having diesel as an option is good because it reduces demand for gas.
 

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it does help with lowering the demand for gas but in north america i doubt it will have a significant effect anytime soon on gas prices, it will take a very long time.
 

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diesels suffer by having low HP numbers.

They are different engines. I don't really compare them

Diesels have lots of low end torque but really not that amazing HP. Petro engines usually don't have as much torque but a bit more HP
 

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low HP and low top end reason why they work so well in big vehicles like trucks and then for commuter cars.
 

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Isn't the low end torque better for large hauling vehicles? I imagine that it isn't good for small vehicles than. I could be wrong about that though.

I mean I don't think people are going to be towing too much with their Mini.
 

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I've driven common rail turbo diesels for the last 6 years. They give a different driving experience to a petrol. The torque is low down in the rev range, that gives you better low down acceleration than most petrol engines. Which is why a 335d is better at overtakes than a M3 and why they are good at lugging loads! But, diesels are heavier and combined with the limited rev range, that changes the way that progress is made at speed. They don't handle as well and aren't as smooth.

Diesels are more economical because they rev so much lower. My 318d is at 2000 rpm at 70 mph in 6th gear.

The new 3 cylinder twin turbo petrol engine in the Cooper bridges the gap with most of its torque available low down in the rev range. This is new for petrols!

In simple terms, if you are going to be driving 30,000 miles a year, buy the diesel, enjoy the mpg and relaxed cruising.

If you are going to be doing 10,000 miles per year, buy the petrol, enjoy the flexibility of the engine and buy a load if options with the money you save!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've driven common rail turbo diesels for the last 6 years. They give a different driving experience to a petrol. The torque is low down in the rev range, that gives you better low down acceleration than most petrol engines. Which is why a 335d is better at overtakes than a M3 and why they are good at lugging loads! But, diesels are heavier and combined with the limited rev range, that changes the way that progress is made at speed. They don't handle as well and aren't as smooth.

Diesels are more economical because they rev so much lower. My 318d is at 2000 rpm at 70 mph in 6th gear.

The new 3 cylinder twin turbo petrol engine in the Cooper bridges the gap with most of its torque available low down in the rev range. This is new for petrols!

In simple terms, if you are going to be driving 30,000 miles a year, buy the diesel, enjoy the mpg and relaxed cruising.

If you are going to be doing 10,000 miles per year, buy the petrol, enjoy the flexibility of the engine and buy a load if options with the money you save!
I made a similar point in another thread. Diesels walk out of the hole much better than petrol, the biggest difference in that would be around town IMO. I think the One D petrols low down torque is more an effect of the turbo if anything..
 
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