Mini Cooper Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today I was driving with the Sport Mode on, and enter to fast on a curve, so I lost control of the car but thankfully I was capable to return without any damage. And now I'm wondering, does the Traction Control is affected when the Sport Mode it's on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Very much doubt it, how are your tyres?

I drive with Traction off a lot of the time (button pressed into Traction Mode) and even then the traction is still technically on, as the light flickers whenever I’m losing traction, and I can feel it still holding me back.

If you hold the traction button down for a couple seconds then I think it fully disables it along with DSC (stability control).

Sport mode still has all of this on, just your throttle is sharper and steering heavier, traction control is always there to reign in the power.

Were you going too hot into a corner and lifted off? Id make sure my rear tyres have good tread, there’s only so much stability can do if your rear end starts to get out of line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I've never lost control going fast around a bend in Sport mode... I'd say it's your tyres...

Sent from my SM-N975F using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: ahmetdouas

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,440 Posts
You have to actively switch dct or traction control off and get warnings about it, sport mode doesn't switch it off. Tyres or tyre pressures or diesel on the road?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
'Today I was driving with the Sport Mode on, and enter to fast on a curve...'

Electronic stability control cannot change the laws of physics and a driver can still lose control if a vehicle is driven without consideration for the road/conditions. Or as others have said, the tyres need looking at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
DSC and DCT are fully enabled in sport mode unless turned off separately (in this case you will have a DSC OFF indicator on your dash).

I find it very difficult to lose control over a MINI with proper tyres so my wild guess would be:
A) You entered a corner too fast or pushed the throttle within a corner too hard, either of which results in under steer and sliding outside of the curve, especially the latter
B) You had worn out tyres or just wrong tyres for the season.

Did I hit the spot with any of these?

P.S. With the text below I mean no offense, but normally the most effective way of driving fast is when your traction control does not kick in, therefore the most important question is “what did I do wrong that I lost control” rather than “where’s my TC to help me into a curve”. I’d recommend reading a little bit about how professional racers take on curves - it’s really inspiring and helps root out bad habits like jerky steering wheel and pedal controls as well as choosing shortest trajectories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thank you all for the replies, my tires are ok, pressure 35 psi (with lower pressure more grip, isnt it?)
I'm supposing that had oil on the road, today I've tested the traction control and it's ok too...

this cars have some kind of issue that makes this safety controls does not work? the kind that does not show me any warnings?

I've open the discussion because I bought the car like 1 month ago, and I'm concerned about this situation and didn't find anything on the internet about it. I'm from Brazil and here I don't have too much people discussing about Mini.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
What tyres do you have? Are they the same front and back?

You could just be unlucky hitting some diesel/oil on the road, I know that my traction light has flickered on a high speed bend a couple times near me, but never felt that the car would step out.
This is when I’m going a lot faster than I should be for the road by the way, so naturally expected it to behave in that manner, especially if I let off mid corner.

Generally I find the Cooper S very stable, I have tried many times to induce liftoff oversteer like my older hatches, but the car has excellent stability to the point it’s a bit boring!

So I would say it’s not normal for the car to lose control like you describe.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,440 Posts
Definitely does not follow that less pressure on a tyre is more grip; I had a Toyota MR2 and the selling garage had pumped up the tyres to Rev 1 spec 29psi instead of Rev2 spec that was 36 psi-i span it almost immediately on a slow corner on dry roads-pumped to proper pressures the car did the same corner nearly 1/3 as fast. Driver error too of course as when i hit the corner first time and felt the thing swaying-and the back coming out stupid instinct meant i dabbed the brakes before realising my mistake-never again-never brake if you over cook a corner in an Mr2 or any mid/rear engine car !!!

Lower pressure can mean more grip if the sidewalls can take it but yours dependent on tyre should be running 42psi-i'd say a couple ie 40psi would be ok but i think 35 is far too low and that could well be your issue-of course we don't know what tyres you have and that would help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
What tyres do you have? Are they the same front and back?

You could just be unlucky hitting some diesel/oil on the road, I know that my traction light has flickered on a high speed bend a couple times near me, but never felt that the car would step out.
This is when I’m going a lot faster than I should be for the road by the way, so naturally expected it to behave in that manner, especially if I let off mid corner.

Generally I find the Cooper S very stable, I have tried many times to induce liftoff oversteer like my older hatches, but the car has excellent stability to the point it’s a bit boring!

So I would say it’s not normal for the car to lose control like you describe.
Yes, I have the same Pirelli P7 Run Flat in the front and back and they are in good conditions. I think that I used too much this "very stable" idea haha

Does any one know if ceramic pads on the rear brakes change something? Because I had to change and put ceramic pads think that would increase the brake power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Definitely does not follow that less pressure on a tyre is more grip; I had a Toyota MR2 and the selling garage had pumped up the tyres to Rev 1 spec 29psi instead of Rev2 spec that was 36 psi-i span it almost immediately on a slow corner on dry roads-pumped to proper pressures the car did the same corner nearly 1/3 as fast. Driver error too of course as when i hit the corner first time and felt the thing swaying-and the back coming out stupid instinct meant i dabbed the brakes before realising my mistake-never again-never brake if you over cook a corner in an Mr2 or any mid/rear engine car !!!

Lower pressure can mean more grip if the sidewalls can take it but yours dependent on tyre should be running 42psi-i'd say a couple ie 40psi would be ok but i think 35 is far too low and that could well be your issue-of course we don't know what tyres you have and that would help.
Its never a good idea brake when you lost control of a car, specially in a corner haha
Thank you very much for your answer, the pressure definitely help to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Yes, I have the same Pirelli P7 Run Flat in the front and back and they are in good conditions. I think that I used too much this "very stable" idea haha
Does any one know if ceramic pads on the rear brakes change something? Because I had to change and put ceramic pads think that would increase the brake power.
No, ceramic brakes in the rear will not change anything within discussion of the current issue.
Ceramic brakes are necessary when you have to brake harshly, repeatedly, often and from high speeds - ceramic brakes indeed have more bite but the main thing with ceramics is that they withstand higher temps and maintain their bite under heavy abuse. However, at the same time you need to warm them up first - cold ceramic brakes are worse then regular ones.

Long story short - more durable brakes won't help you push you in a corner better via DSC.
However, this most likely will, and unlike ceramics. this is free of charge :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
No, ceramic brakes in the rear will not change anything within discussion of the current issue.
Ceramic brakes are necessary when you have to brake harshly, repeatedly, often and from high speeds - ceramic brakes indeed have more bite but the main thing with ceramics is that they withstand higher temps and maintain their bite under heavy abuse. However, at the same time you need to warm them up first - cold ceramic brakes are worse then regular ones.

Long story short - more durable brakes won't help you push you in a corner better via DSC.
However, this most likely will, and unlike ceramics. this is free of charge :)
Awesome!!! Thanks!!!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top